customer championEven if the C-suite says customer experience is a priority to the business, oftentimes, you need a CX Champion to make customer experience a reality in the day-to-day. Some organizations have a Chief Customer Officer. You might think that’s the definition of a “customer experience champion.” But anybody, regardless of title, can fight the good fight to put customers first. And, here’s why it’s important someone does:

A customer champion makes customer data relevant

By showing different teams how customer insights can make their work easier, you are more likely to get buy-in for investing in the customer experience.

A CX Champion in the call center might get started by looking for ways to shed calls and decrease call duration. At the same time, s/he must make sure that customers have a pleasant, productive, effortless experience with agents. A CX Champion from marketing can use customer insights to refine the brand message. S/he also uses CX data to create product messaging and advertising campaigns. A CX Champion in operations could use feedback to streamline processes, drive consistency across customer interactions and touchpoints, and re-define the customer journey.

A customer champion brings numbers to life

ADP’s vice president of client experience Tom Mueller was named a 2014 Customer Champion by 1to1Media. According to Mueller, “some people assume that we’re just data collectors and we slice and dice the data and then move on. We had to get away from simply presenting numbers and stats and do more storytelling.”

Mueller explains that presenting customer data as part of a narrative, with actual quotes from customer feedback illustrating key points, helps his colleagues better understand customer needs. This type of storytelling also helps other areas of the business understand the essence of customer experience.  For example, legal and IT may not directly benefit from a CX program, but their buy-in is important.

A customer champion breaks down silos

One of the biggest challenges CX teams face is breaking down silos to make sure their customer insights actually get into the hands of the teams that can act on them. Many departments are initially skeptical of the use, reliability, and value of CX insights.

There are many ways a CX Champion can break down silos, for example, a Champion can help to launch internal forums. At GE Healthcare, the CX team constantly leads educational efforts, such as launching an internal website, holding summits, and hosting lunch and learns, to highlight what they are doing and the type of value-added analysis they can produce to help meet business goals.

Another tactic is to embed CX terms and principles across the company. At Autodesk’s main offices, multiple flat screens display customer comments alongside Customer Support Interaction scores for all employees to see. The company’s daily jargon has expanded, and terms such as Customer CSAT and NPS have become well known and understood metrics. As a result, the appetite to read and listen to customer comments has increased tremendously.

A customer champion cuts costs

Sharing and embedding customer insights across different departments means solutions can be put in place to streamline internal processes. For example in the contact center, a majority of call center agents (65%) feel as though customers are generally asking the same questions repeatedly, but if this information isn’t routed to the correct departments throughout the company, then the necessary systems for solving these recurring problems aren’t in place. The company is simply incurring costs to solve the same problem over and over again, instead of putting a solution in place.

 

If your business or team is serious about improving the customer experience, a CX Champion can help make sure it actually happens. To learn more about how a CX Champion can build a CX team, read our eBook, How to Become the Perfect Customer Experience Champion.