CX Dictionary

What is Customer Effort?

Effort evaluates how easy or hard a customer experience is.

Effort is the amount of work a customer has to exert to interact with a business, service or product. The level of effort can vary for different aspects of a single experience and may range from absolutely impossible to wonderfully painless. Customers’ impression of their own efforts are strongly tied to their expectations of the service which may vary dramatically between different companies, products and use cases.

To assess effort, many organizations will ask customers to self-report their perceived effort on surveys; however, this approach endures the natural bias of self-reporting and limits responses to brand-owned channels. Effort can be also be evaluated by analyzing the words used in a customer’s actual feedback.

Why do you need to evaluate effort?

Research has shown that effort is a leading indicator of loyalty. Using effort as a KPI can guide companies in identifying emerging issues before they explode into major issues that impact loyalty and the bottom line. Additionally, effort affords empathy by helping analysts relate in more human terms (rather than arbitrary numbers). Empathy produces more immediate action and more customer-centric solutions. The result? Better business, happier customers.

The Clarabridge Effort Score

Clarabridge understands effort. The Clarabridge Effort Score, the first of its kind, uses our industry-leading text analytics and Natural Language Processing capabilities in conjunction with the newest AI and machine learning technologies to evaluate the level of effort expressed in any piece of customer feedback. By interpreting not only grammar but also customer intent, the Clarabridge engine understands all aspects of the customer experience, not simply numerical ones. This feature allows customer experience professionals to go beyond the common effort survey question. Companies can now quantify their customers’ effort across all feedback and interaction channels, both solicited (surveys) and unsolicited (calls, chat, email, social networks, reviews, agent notes, forums), allowing them to develop a more holistic understanding of their customer and to get ahead of problems wherever they may occur.